Cisco tells employees in order to avoid China travel, backtracks – Nikkei Asian Review then

Cisco tells employees in order to avoid China travel, backtracks – Nikkei Asian Review then

HONG KONG — U.S. network equipment maker Cisco Systems warned its employees never to happen to be China but withdrew the ban then, suggesting anxiety among American companies over possible tit-for-tat retaliation for the arrest of rival Huawei Technologies’ finance chief.

In an interior memo obtained by the Nikkei Asian Review, Cisco told its employees that “because of recent events surrounding the arrest of a Chinese citizen in Canada on the request of USA police authorities, Cisco is implementing a restriction of most nonessential travel by U.S.-based Cisco employees into China.”



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The memo out&nbsp was sent; on Wednesday that Meng Wanzhou after Canada announced, the principle financial officer of the Chinese technology company, was arrested in the united kingdom under a U.S. extradition request, on charges of violating sanctions against Iran.

“The restriction will need effect immediately,” Cisco said in the memo, adding that employees who’ve happen to be China planned “are increasingly being advised of the restriction on nonessential travel so as to facilitate a big change.”

A representative at the California-based company on Friday told the Nikkei Asian Review, however, that the e-mail “was submitted error for some employees” and “will not reflect Cisco policy.”

“We’ve not implemented restrictions on travel and normal business happen to be China continues,” the spokesperson said.

Meng is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, and her arrest comes as trade tensions between China and the U.S. were easing.

Curbing staff travel to China for safety considerations rare&nbsp isn’t;for international companies. In October soon after a UBS Group employee was detained in Beijing, the Swiss bank asked a few of its bankers never to happen to be China reportedly.

Citigroup, Standard JPMorgan&nbsp and Chartered;followed suit and asked their private banking staff to reconsider planing a trip to China or put their trips on hold, in accordance with several media reports. Those travel bans were short-lived apparently.

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