Icelandic volcano is 'going to erupt' on scale that dwarfs explosion which halted flights in 2010

Icelandic volcano is 'going to erupt' on scale that dwarfs explosion which halted flights in 2010

Giant Icelandic volcano is ‘about to erupt’ on scale that dwarfs explosion which halted flights across Europe

  • Scientists have warned that Katla is showing clear signs it will blow  
  • Katla is really a close neighbour to Eyjafjallajokull that erupted devastatingly in 2010 
  • British and Icelandic scientists say Katla is releasing C02 on a ‘huge’ scale

Leigh Mcmanus For Mailonline

A giant and ‘highly hazardous’ volcano in Iceland is showing signs that it might erupt on a scale that dwarfs the explosion that disrupted worldwide flights eight years back.

Scientists have warned that Katla, a detailed neighbour to Eyjafjallajokull that erupted this year 2010, is showing clear signs it will blow for the very first time since 1918 and it’s really not just a matter of if, however when.  

Katla’s cone is hidden beneath a glacier on a 5,000ft peak, making monitoring its activity difficult but Icelandic and British scientists have discovered by airborne measurement techniques that Katla is releasing skin tightening and on a ‘huge’ scale.

A satellite image of Katla Volcano situated on the south coast of Iceland near Eyjafjallajokull

A satellite image of Katla Volcano situated on the south coast of Iceland near Eyjafjallajokull

A satellite image of Katla Volcano situated on the south coast of Iceland near Eyjafjallajokull

Katla is really a close neighbour of Eyjafjallajokull that erupted this year 2010 causing flights chaos 

Katla is really a close neighbour of Eyjafjallajokull that erupted this year 2010 causing flights chaos 

Katla is really a close neighbour of Eyjafjallajokull that erupted this year 2010 causing flights chaos 

Iceland and volcanoes  

Iceland's most active volcano, Hekla

Iceland's most active volcano, Hekla

Iceland’s most active volcano, Hekla

There are over 100 volcanoes on the central plateau that have not erupted during the past thousand years and between 30 and 40 which are active, and therefore they will have erupted within last few centuries.

On average, Iceland experiences a significant volcanic event every 5 years once. Since the DARK AGES, a third of all lava which has covered the earth’s surface has erupted in Iceland. 

However, in accordance with a recently available geological hypothesis, this estimate will not include submarine eruptions, which are a lot more extensive than those on the land surface. 

The most well-known and active volcano in Iceland is mount Hekla, which includes erupted 18 times since 1104, the final amount of time in 2000. Other active volcanoes, measured with regards to the quantity of eruptions besides Hekla, are Grímsvötn, Katla, Krafla and askja. Katla, has erupted about 20 times because the settlement of Iceland.

Iceland.is

This type of activity indicates its magma chambers are filling and may signal an enormous eruption. 

Sarah Barsotti, co-ordinator for volcanic hazards at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told The Sunday Times: ‘There is not any method of telling when it’ll erupt, that it will just.’

The translation of Katla is ‘kettle’ or ‘boiler’ and its particular ‘overdue’ eruption probably will overshadow the eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano this year 2010, which resulted in a large number of passengers being stranded because the ash plume from the volcano halted air traffic across most of Europe, with a domino effect over the global world.

Barsotti said the impact of the eruption on flights ‘depends on the intensity of the eruption and the direction of the winds at the time’.

Evgenia Ilyinskaya, a extensive research fellow in the Institute of Geophysics and Tectonics at Leeds University, said an eruption is overdue with Katla having previously erupted every 50 years typically pre-1918 when it last blew its top completely.       

Ilyinskaya and her fellow scientists — week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters &mdash whose report into the volcano was published last; day discovered that Katla was releasing between 12 and 24 kilotons of skin tightening and every. 

Only two other volcanoes on earth are recognized to emit more.     

‘Through high-precision airborne measurements and atmospheric dispersion modelling, we show that Katla, a hazardous subglacial volcano which last erupted a century ago highly, is probably the largest volcanic resources of CO2 on the planet, releasing around 5% of total global volcanic emissions,’ they wrote.

Katla, the 1512 m volcano in southern Iceland, is preparing to erupt fully for the very first time since 1918

Katla, the 1512 m volcano in southern Iceland, is preparing to erupt fully for the very first time since 1918

Katla, the 1512 m volcano in southern Iceland, is preparing to erupt fully for the very first time since 1918

Katla's cone is hidden beneath glacier on 5,000ft peak, making monitoring its activity difficult

Katla's cone is hidden beneath glacier on 5,000ft peak, making monitoring its activity difficult

Katla’s cone is hidden beneath glacier on 5,000ft peak, making monitoring its activity difficult

Ilyinskaya told The Sunday Times that the CO2 emissions from Katla were ‘huge’. As the magna would meet a 3,000ft-thick icecap, developed because it last erupted, a good small eruption was more likely to result in a larger ash plume than Eyjafjallajokull’s this year 2010, she added.

Ilyinskaya added that emissions increase prior to eruptions, a matter of years sometimes, and we realize this from studies on other huge volcanoes in Alaska and Hawaii. 

Last week she told the Icelandic national broadcasting service that the quantity of CO2 indicated significant activity which could not be explained by normal geothermal activity. 

Katla is really a close neighbour to Eyjafjallajokull that erupted devastatingly this year 2010

Katla is really a close neighbour to Eyjafjallajokull that erupted devastatingly this year 2010

Katla is really a close neighbour to Eyjafjallajokull that erupted devastatingly in 2010

The eruption caused enormous disruption to flights across western and northern Europe

The eruption caused enormous disruption to flights across western and northern Europe

The eruption caused enormous disruption to flights across western and northern Europe

Iceland sits on the edge of two tectonic plates therefore has a massive amount eruptions

Iceland sits on the edge of two tectonic plates therefore has a massive amount eruptions

Iceland sits on the edge of two tectonic plates therefore has a massive amount eruptions

She said: ‘There must be considered a magma build-up release a this level of gas.

‘This is really a clear sign we must keep a detailed eye on Katla. She is not only doing nothing, and these findings concur that there’s something going on.’ 

Ilyinskaya and her team said that more studies were had a need to confirm if the quantity of magma was increasing as time passes. 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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