Tottori Prefecture named Japan’s No. 1 travel destination for 2019

Tottori Prefecture named Japan’s No. 1 travel destination for 2019

Tottori Prefecture has been chosen because the No. 1 destination of GaijinPot Travel’s Top 10 Japan Travel Destinations for 2019. The tiny prefecture in western Japan topped the list released by Japan-based English-language travel website GaijinPot Travel within its third annual travel awards that recognize up-and-coming travel destinations in Japan for foreign tourists.

Tottori Governor Shinji Hirai said he was delighted to be named the first-place winner.

“It really is an honor to be selected as No. 1,” Hirai said. “Create a visit to adventure destination Tottori and see on your own precisely what made us No. 1 in 2019.”

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Photo: ALEXANDRA HOMMA

Tottori may be the least populated prefecture in Japan and is well known for having Japan&rsquo best;s largest sand dunes which are accessible to the general public. Its unique natural features alongside its pop culture presence are simply part of why is it stick out.

GaijinPot Travel designated Tottori’s “adventure destination” initiative as a driving force behind the award. Victoria Vlisides, GaijinPot Travel editor-in- chief, said Tottori exemplifies a massive variety and level of adventure tourism spots and activities.

“Our research showed that travelers are trying to find real adventures and experiences that exceed the typical, of just sightseeing instead,” Vlisides said. “A 2019 world tourism trend is that travelers desire to link up their trip with one-of-a-kind adrenaline rushes.”

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Photo: DAVID JASKIEWICZ
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Photo: DAVID JASKIEWICZ
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Some types of Tottori’s adventure tourism are scaling boulders and hiking in traditional mountain priest straw sandals on the mountain pilgrimage to Nageire-do, Japan’s “most dangerous national treasure”; fat-tire biking, sand and paragliding boarding on sand dunes; kayaking through rock formations across the Sanin Coast &ldquo and geoparks;killer” snowboarding and activities on Mount Daisen outdoors, among Japan’s Top 100 mountains.

Each destination in the most notable 10, which includes spots all around the national country, receives a GaijinPot Travel Top Destination for 2019 Award and, more for the lesser-known destinations importantly, a lift in awareness among GaijinPot’s audience of near 1 million, 56 percent which overseas are based.

What may be the evaluation criteria?

GaijinPot brand strategy manager Rebecca Quin said the evaluation for the ultimate list was determined through a lot of time of research by GaijinPot’s team of travel experts. The GaijinPot Travel editorial board selected each 2019 destination predicated on these three main criteria, in order that the destination:

  1. Reflects advances in social/technological initiatives and innovation because they relate with tourism
  2. Has significant developments and/or events happening in 2019
  3. Reflects one of many up-and-coming world tourism and travel trends determined via independent research

Read more about why Tottori may be the top choice on this article released in November: https://travel.gaijinpot.com/top-10-japan-travel-destinations-for-2019

About GaijinPot

GaijinPot.com is Japan’s longest running foreign media source for foreigners living, traveling and attempting to Japan. The web site is viewed a lot more than 7 monthly.7 million times, in February and, it shall celebrate its 20-year anniversary.

GaijinPot Travel may be the travel portion of GaijinPot that highlights regions of Japan for foreign travelers. September 2018 in, GaijinPot Travel was acknowledged by the Japan Tourism Awards among the up-and-coming website/technology methods that’s connecting remote and local parts of Japan with inbound tourists.

Both sites are operated by GPlusMedia Inc., a subsidiary of Fuji Media Holdings.

© Japan Today

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